Critics love RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS

02 Oct

Since it was announced that RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS would premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, the media has been buzzing about the film. A dozen reviews of the film have been published since the beginning of September. Here is a small sample of what they’ve been saying:

“It’s a tough, gritty piece of work, long on the violence but invested with the poetic sensibility you find in a Cormac McCarthy novel or Tom Waits song.” – James Adams, Globe & Mail, September 4th, 2013

“It’s an impressively accomplished debut, a startling, unsettling narrative, and a series of strong performances that should solidify this as a future touchstone in both Native and English Canadian cinema. – Jason Gorber, TwitchFilm.com, Sept 20th

“Rhymes For Young Ghouls is a tremendously rousing film that announces the arrival of an exciting new voice in Canadian cinema.” – Scott A. Gray, Exclaim, Sept 11th

“Barnaby’s crisp direction shines a weathered lens on an ugly, intolerable part of our history. The filmmaker digs up the corpses of the desecrated dead, painting a portrait of history with its own ashes.” – Jacob Boon, The Halifax Coast, Sept 11th

“The film almost defies classification with the tone, energy, and atmosphere the team creates. It’s brutal and frank, but also darkly funny and wickedly entertaining.” – Cinemablogapher, Sept 12th, 2013

“The most shocking thing about the nightmare world in Jeff Barnaby’s eye-opening masterpiece is that it’s real. Aila and her revenge plot are fiction, but the abuse of First Nations is fact. Documented cases in the missionary-run residential school system were acknowledged by the Anglican Church of Canada (1993), and the Vatican (2009). While we preach human rights to countries abroad, we need more Jeff Barnabys to open our eyes. We can’t change a past most of us were sheltered from, but we can move forward educated, aware, and with compassion.” – Isabel Cupryn, Canadian Film Review

“it skips seamlessly between moments of levity to moments so brutal the gasps coming from the audience were some of the strongest reactions I’ve ever seen towards a film.” – Nat Master, DearCastandCrew.com, Sept 30th, 2013

For information on upcoming screenings (in Vancouver, Montreal and Toronto), make sure you like our Facebook page.

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS selected to World Premiere at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival

07 Aug

Rhymes for Young Ghouls – clip #1 from Prospector Films on Vimeo.

We are proud to announce that the feature film RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS, written and directed by Jeff Barnaby (The Colony, File Under Miscellaneous), will have its world premiere at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival. The film stars Kahnawake based Mohawk actress Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs in her first starring role and veteran Mi’gMaq actor Glen Gould (Charlie Zone, Cashing In) starring in his third Jeff Barnaby film. This is Jeff’s debut feature film.

Prospector Films will also participate in TIFF’s Pitch This! Competition with Daniel Beirne’s feature film project, STAY GIRL.

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS

Red Crow Mi’gMaq reservation, 1976: By government decree, every Indian child under the age of 16 must attend residential school. In the kingdom of the crow, that means imprisonment at St. Dymphna’s. That means being at the mercy of “Popper”, the sadistic Indian agent who runs the school.

At 15, Aila is the weed princess of Red Crow. Hustling with her uncle Burner, she sells enough dope to pay Popper her “truancy tax”, keeping her out her out of St.Ds. But when Aila’s drug money is stolen and her father Joseph returns from prison, the precarious balance of Aila’s world is destroyed.
Her only options are to run or fight … and Mi’gMaq don’t run.

“I want to take the violence and sadness that exists on reserves and create a
human hero. I need to show Native people just how strong we are.”

– Jeff Barnaby, writer/director/editor

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS is Barnaby’s debut feature film, after having previously directed multiple short films, including The Colony and File Under Miscellaneous, which both previously premiered at TIFF in ’07 and ’10. Barnaby’s screenplay, RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS won the Tribeca Film Festival’s Creative Promise Award for Narrative, beating out hundreds other scripts from across North America.

RHYMES FOR YOUNG GHOULS is the 20th film to be produced through the CFC features program and was financed by SODEC, Telefilm, Bell Media’s The Movie Network, Corus Entertainment’s Movie Central, the Canadian Film Centre, Quebec and Canadian tax credits, the Harold Greenberg Fund, the Quebec Arts Council and Tribeca All Access.

The film is being represented by Les Film Seville in Canada and by Entertainment One International for world sales.

LAST WOMAN STANDING screening in Montreal JULY 9th

02 Jul

LAST WOMAN STANDING will play at The Cinémathèque Québécoise Theatre in Montreal Tuesday July 9th, 7pm. Filmmakers and Ariane Fortin will be in attendance.

Tickets are $10, buy them online, and pick them up at the cinema. Tickets will also be available at the door, but limited capacity, so get your tickets early!

7 PM – pick up ticket at the boxoffice at 6:30 pm
At The Cinémathèque québécoise Theatre.

Claude Jutra room
335, De Maisonneuve Blvd East
Montréal, Québec, H2X 1K1

Berri-UQAM Metro (De Maisonneuve exit)


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